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Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation

One of the more recent and much discussed objectives of criminal law is rehabilitation. One of the primary goals of penal laws is to teach an individual who has taken part in detrimental behavior that his or her actions were wrong. Rehabilitation aims at changing a dangerous criminal into someone who can benefit society. 
If rehabilitation efforts are successful, then a criminal will be able to reside in a community without posing a threat to the well-being of the people around them.
Based on this philosophy, penal laws should be utilized in order to ensure that convicts are given the tools and knowledge that they need in order to avoid committing further offenses. Rehabilitation aims at providing criminals with the treatment that they need in order to return to public life as a forthright and honorable individual. The philosophy of rehabilitation has been very controversial since its inception in the 19th Century.
A very common and widespread mentality is that penal laws have been established in order to provide punishment to individuals who have disregarded the law and caused harm to other people. However, punishment does not provide convicts with the resources that they need in order to create an honest future once they are released from prison. 
In many cases, individuals who are punished for their actions under penal laws through fines and imprisonment develop resentment and bitterness. These individuals may return to society as angry people and may be more likely to become repeat offenders.
Effective rehabilitation will teach criminals that their behavior was wrong and it will reincorporate them into the community as individuals who can contribute to society. Therefore, rehabilitation is perceived as more successful at decreasing the likelihood of repeat offenses than punishment and deterrence. 
Tulane University has developed a program in which they practice rehabilitation on individuals who have been incarcerated or punished for violating penal laws. This program is run by individuals who have once been imprisoned for committing crimes. 
It provides ex-convicts with therapy and education that will help them to acknowledge the consequences and the cruelty of their actions. It will also supply them with assistance finding employment and occupational training so that they have the tools that they need to develop a successful future.
Individuals who have a means of maintaining a steady income will not need to partake in criminal activity for their livelihood. The research that has been done about this program has found that the criminals who took part in the rehabilitation were exceedingly less likely to become repeat offenders than ex-inmates who did not take part in the project. It is true that this philosophy will not be effective on every individual who has disregarded penal laws.
Some criminals have committed themselves to a life of crime and no amount of counseling and training will help these individuals to be successfully reinstated into the community as beneficial members of society. Individuals who do not want to be helped and who do not want to change will continue to take part in criminal activity. However, many ex-convicts can benefit a great deal from rehabilitation.

Restitution At A Glance

Restitution At A Glance

One common practice in criminal law is restitution. Restitution occurs when a criminal is required to compensate a victim or society for any damage that he or she has caused as part of his or her sentence. In many instances, restitution will occur in addition to one or more of the other criminal law objectives.
 
 
Under this philosophy, a level of fairness must be attained. It will prevent an individual from benefiting from behavior that has caused harm to another person or another person's property.
 
 
The judge will decide on a restitution that is fitting for the crime that the individual has committed. For example, the offender may be required to reimburse an individual for an object that the perpetrator stole or damaged. This philosophy and practice ensures that a victim is compensated for their loss and that an offender does not benefit from their detrimental and illegal actions.
 
 
An individual who has violated a criminal law may be required to pay restitution. A person who has stolen money from another individual or from a company may be obligated to pay back the money that he or she has spent. Criminal law may require an individual who has disregarded the law to pay restitution even after he or she has carried out other aspects of their sentence. 
 
 
For example, an individual who has served time in jail as punishment for a crime that he or she has committed may be obligated to start paying restitution once he or she is released from prison. The judge may order the criminal to provide the victim with a monthly check for a designated amount of money. The convict will need to continue paying the victim until the allocated amount of restitution has been paid.
 
 
Although it is very common for restitution to involve payment by money, it may also occur through the dedication of time and services. Under criminal law, an individual who has committed a crime that has harmed society or that has presented a danger to their community may be required to take part in community service. 
 
 
During community service, an individual will be required to complete various tasks for which he or she is not compensated. A specific number of hours will be designated by the court and the convict will be obligated to complete all of these service hours.
 
 
The services that the individual will provide will directly benefit the community. The tasks will range a great deal and may include painting, assisting local non-profit organizations, picking up litter and trash off of the streets and in parks, and gardening. This work may take part in large groups, or an individual may complete their community service sentence on their own under the supervision of an appointed authority.
 
 
An individual who is required to pay restitution may also be sentenced to provide services and labor directly to the victim that he or she has harmed. For example, if the criminal has damaged the property of another individual, then the offender may be required to repair the damages. 
 
 
The judge may order a perpetrator to take part in activities, such as rebuilding a shed that he or she has damaged, replacing windows that he or she has broken, or repairing fences that were crippled during the offender’s deviant escapade. Restitution will help to attain a level of balance and fairness that not only assists in deterring an offender from future crime, but also compensates a victim for the damage that the perpetrator has caused.

Retribution Defined

Retribution Defined

Criminal law cases often result in a court-authorized sentence that an offender must carry out. This sentence may include community service, hefty fines, and jail time. One of the most common and widely acknowledged objectives of criminal law sentencing is retribution.
 
 
Defendants in criminal law cases have taken part in some offense that has resulted in them facing trial. Often, their behavior may have caused harm to another individual or damage to another individual's property. The behavior which causes individuals to face criminal law cases may range in severity. 
 
 
Individuals who are involved in criminal law cases may face minor misdemeanor charges or they may face severe felony charges. The most common misdemeanor offenses include traffic violations, such as running a stop sign or speeding. An individual knows that these behaviors are wrong and potentially dangerous, but he or she chooses to take part in them anyway.
 
 
These minor offenses usually do not result in criminal law cases. However, retribution will still be exacted upon the perpetrator. They will be required to pay hefty fines if they are caught partaking in this illegal behavior. If he or she continues to disregard traffic laws, then a violator may have his or her license revoked and will lose his or her driving privileges. These perpetrators have broken the law and must be reprimanded for their offenses.
 
 
In other criminal law cases, an individual may have subjected another person to physical harm or death. These offenders have disregarded the sanctity of life and retribution must be sought in order to punish them for their actions.
 
 
Retribution is the most frequently cited objective for the imprisonment or the punishment of an individual who has committed a crime. The United States criminal justice system has developed the mentality that a punishment must be designated that fits the crime. 
 
 
The retribution that will be exacted upon a criminal must be of equal severity to the crime that the offender has committed. For example, an individual who has committed murder will have his or her life taken from him or her. This may occur by sentencing the perpetrator to the death penalty or life in prison.

Everything You Need to Know About Deterrence

Everything You Need to Know About Deterrence

Criminal laws are often established in order to deter individuals from taking part in detrimental behavior that has been deemed illegal. One of the primary objectives of sentencing individuals who violate criminal laws is deterrence. Laws are developed in order to ensure that the safety and well-being of citizens is protected and upheld. Individuals who disregard these laws endanger the well-being of themselves and other individuals. 
 
 
Deterrence occurs when an individual experiences a punishment that discourages him or her from taking part in the same behavior again. Deterring an individual from disregarding criminal laws may help save lives. One common example of deterrence is the punishment for driving under the influence. 
 
 
An individual who is charged with driving under the influence may experience several penalties for his or her behavior, including fines, jail time, and the revocation of his or her license. The fines are often very expensive and may include fees ranging from a few hundred to thousands of dollars. Perpetrators may be required to spend some time in prison. This may include up to a few months of jail time. 
 
 
Also, individuals who are caught driving while intoxicated will have their license suspended for several months. This will affect the offender's day-to-day routine. Offenders may experience trouble getting to and from work, or running basic errands. Once an individual experiences these penalties, the hope is that he or she will be less likely to take part in this behavior again.
 
 
Deterrence may occur in multiple ways. Individual deterrence occurs when a criminal is punished for his or her behavior. The penalties that he or she has experienced are aimed at convincing the offender that taking part in illegal actions is not worth the consequences that he or she will face.
 
 
General deterrence arises on a much larger scale. Individuals who are responsible for disregarding criminal laws will be punished with various penalties. These penalties are often harsh and unwanted. By ensuring that criminals receive consequences for their actions, other individuals will be discouraged from taking part in similar activities. 
 
 
They will understand that individuals who are caught disregarding the law will be subject to fines or jail time. If individuals witness other people have their lives put on hold for taking part in specific behavior, then the observers will be less likely to take part in that behavior.
 
 
In general, people do not want to take part in actions that are going to be detrimental to their well-being and their futures. If they know that a behavior has severe consequences, then they may not take part in that behavior. There has been some controversy about the use of punishment for violating criminal laws as a method of deterrence. 
 
 
Many people argue that individuals who disregard criminal laws do not stop to consider the consequences of their actions before they engage in illegal activities. Therefore, some argue that court-authorized sentences are not effective in deterring individuals from committing crimes.