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The Separate Jurisdictions of International Law

The Separate Jurisdictions of International Law

International law is a very complex and often confusing topic. Throughout the majority of history, international law has focused much less on individuals than State and Federal law. International law generally focuses on entire states or on oppressive and violent governments.
International laws have been established in order to govern the way in which states and countries interact with each other. In recent decades, international laws have begun to focus on the apprehension and the punishment of dangerous individuals. In most cases, the creation of international laws falls to the United Nations. However, international law is often very difficult to enforce because international relations criticize violating the rights of a sovereign state.
Each country is responsible for governing its own territory and in most cases it is not considered to be acceptable to interfere with the way in which a government chooses to manage its own country. Interfering with the governing of a sovereign state may lead to a war between countries. 
However, there are some instances when the necessity for international laws is very apparent. On occasion, a country will take it upon itself to enforce international law if it feels that international security relies on the apprehension of an individual or a government that is posing a threat to the safety of other states.
In general, international laws are related to crimes against humanity. Usually, crimes against humanity are committed by a government or a regime. The occurrence of these crimes are not isolated incidents. Instead this heinous behavior is symptomatic of the way a government chooses to function. Crimes against humanity include actions such as torture, homicide, and rape.

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