Home DEA

DEA

Finding Drug Enforcement Careers in DEA

Finding Drug Enforcement Careers in DEA

The DEA not only offers DEA careers as specialized agents directly in the field, but also a wide variety of opportunities for employment in other areas as well. The DEA, boasting an annual budget of nearly 2.5 billion dollars, can offer an exciting environment for any person interested in working toward the ultimate goal of controlling and curtailing the use of illegal drugs and controlled substances in the United States, as well as the rest of the world. DEA training is very good and an agent who enters into DEA careers and seeks such DEA training will profit from it greatly.
 
 
Aside from offering positions as special agents, DEA careers also include opportunities for recruitment in other fields such as Diversion Investigator, Chemist, Intelligence Research Specialist, Forensic Specialist, Accounting, and Information Technology. DEA careers offer opportunities to qualified entry level applicants as well as their own student programs. It is important to note that each career will have specific demands and requirements to be met in order to be considered as an eligible recruit or applicant, and each career will require a different type of DEA training.
 
 
DEA careers all have the same basic requirements in order to be considered eligible for hire and for DEA training. All applicants must be United States citizens, and all males born after 12/31/59 must be registered with the Selective Service System. The DEA administers a mandatory drug test for illicit drugs that must be successfully passed, as well as a DEA Drug Questionnaire to show compliance with DEA drug policies and regulations. A background check is also necessary and must be passed as well. Certain DEA careers will require certain other criteria, depending on the nature of the position.
 
 
A Diversion Investigator is responsible for conducting research and investigations regarding the issue of diversion of drug and controlled chemical use. The rise of the illicit use of pharmaceutical and certain controlled substances and illegal distributors and pharmacies, a Diversion Investigator plays an important role in helping to solve this recent crisis. Some of the basic responsibilities of a Diversion Investigator include:
 
         Investigative work
 
 
         Gathering, research, and analysis of data
 
 
         Identification of significant factors
 
 
         Development of solutions
 
 
         Interpretation of legislation and regulations
 
 
Applicants for a Diversion Investigator career are subject to medical and physical examinations in order to render the applicant as mentally and physically able to undergo DEA training and to perform the duties assigned. A vision test is also administered, requiring 20/40 distance vision and 20/25 near vision. Depth perception and a color plate test are also conducted. The hearing requirement is that an applicant must be able to hear a conversation from twenty feet effectively from both ears.  A valid driver's license is also required and the ability to be relocated is a must, for DEA careers are constantly on the move throughout the country.
 
 
A Forensic Chemist is responsible for the research and study of the manufacture and production of drugs and substances to determine their chemical compositions. They will help determine if such a chemical compound coincides with the DEA regulations as well as the Controlled Substances Act, and also their viability for abuse and addiction. A four-year degree with a major in the physical or life sciences or engineering plus at least 30 semester hours in chemistry and mathematics, and an additional six semester hours in physics are considered eligible for this DEA career.
 
 
Fingerprint Specialists will work with the latest technology in examining latent prints as well as developing new methods in analyzing fingerprints. A four-year degree in the related sciences fields is required, as well as the completion of a DEA training program designed specifically for Fingerprint Specialists.
 
 
Intelligence Research Specialists work closely on the most important drug investigations and are involved in counter-operations in efforts to curtail and stop the use of illegal substances. This career allows for the direct support in fighting drug trafficking, terrorism, and violent crimes. DEA careers of this nature seek out those with experience in the administrative, professional, or investigative fields through prior or scholastic experience. The DEA training program, Basic Intelligence Research Specialist Training Course, must be completed by newly hired prospects. This career also requires the willingness to relocate at any given time.
 
 
The DEA also implements special student and internship programs in order to allow for prospective employees for DEA careers and DEA training a first-hand account of working for the top drug enforcement agency in the world. Currently, there are Accounting internships available to those currently working toward an accounting degree, received an accounting degree, or have at least 24 hours in accounting supplementing their degree in another field. The internship lasts two years, and the intern may be immediately considered for employment without having to compete with other prospective employees, depending on the successful completion of the program. The DEA training will most certainly help any intern in their future if they decide to take another route in terms of a career.

An Overview of the Drug Enforcement Agency

An Overview of the Drug Enforcement Agency

The Drug Enforcement Agency, or DEA, is the chief organization of the United States involved in the war on drugs.  The Drug Enforcement Agency was created in July of 1973 under President Richard Nixon. It began with about 1,500 Special Agents and a budget of less than $75 million.  By 1974, the DEA expanded to include 43 offices in 31 foreign countries. Today, the DEA has over 5,000 special agents with a budget over $2.3 billion with 87 offices in 63 foreign countries. 
The purpose of the DEA was to become the single Federal agency to enforce the nation’s drug laws as provided for by the Controlled Substances Act and control the Government’s anti-drug affairs.  The Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Office of Drug Abuse Law Enforcement, and other Federal offices were combined and merged to officially become the Drug Enforcement Agency.  
The main purpose of the DEA is to not only enforce the United States’ drug laws and regulations, but also to bring to justice those individuals or groups involved in the manufacturing, growing, and trafficking of illegal drugs and controlled substances.  The DEA currently has 21 offices on domestic soil which include Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, El Paso, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Newark, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, Pheonix, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, St. Louis, and Washington, D.C.  Currently, the DEA is headed by Michele Leonhart, the acting Administrator of the Agency. 
The Drug Enforcement Agency currently has twenty-two programs and operations in place which include:
 
         Asset Forfeiture
         Cannabis Eradication
         Computer Forensics
         Diversion Control
         International Drug Enforcement Conference
         Money Laundering
         Intelligence
Since 1986, the Drug Enforcement Agency has been responsible for over 620,000 arrests in the United States alone. They also seized almost 50,000kgs of cocaine, nearly 600kgs of heroin, over 660,000kgs of marijuana, and 1,500kgs of methamphetamine in the 2008 calendar year alone. Aside from its overall goal and purpose to eradicate illegal drugs, it has its own mission statement that it attempts to achieve:
 
         Prosecution of all major violators of the controlled substance laws, both on the national and international levels;
         Management of national drug intelligence programs at the Federal, State, local, and international levels;
         Seizing and forfeiture of all assets derived from illegal drug trafficking;
         Coordination of international drug control programs with the United Nations and Interpol;
         Strict enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act.
The Drug Enforcement Agency has also implemented a Diversion Control Program, which is an attempt to curtail and regulate the abuse of prescription drugs and medicines.  Many of the legitimately produced and used medical drugs or substances have been subject to abuse and/or addiction, and the DEA is taking provisions and measures to stop the illegal practices concerning prescription medication. 
The DEA is responsible for the registration of all manufacturers and producers of controlled substances and implements strict policies regarding the sale, prescription, distributing, and manufacturing of controlled substances and prescriptions.  The Drug Enforcement Agency is single-handedly the foremost organization or faction in the ongoing war on drugs in North America.

Know the Creation and Purpose of the DEA

Know the Creation and Purpose of the DEA

The Drug Enforcement Administration, or the DEA, has its roots that date back to President Richard Nixon’s administration. The history of the Drug Enforcement Administration dates back to the 1st of July, 1973, when it was established as part of the Reorganization Plan No. 2 legislation introduced the same year. The new law proposed for the creation of a single Federal agency designed and responsible for all of the nation’s drug control activities and policies.
Drug Enforcement Administration history begins when the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Office of Drug Abuse Law Enforcement, and other Federal agencies that were combined to form the Drug Enforcement Agency. The first Drug Enforcement Administration headquarters was located in downtown Washington, D.C. at 1405 I Street. The new Drug Enforcement Administration began with only 1,470 Special Agents and a budget of $75 million. In two years time, those numbers would almost double, with over 2,100 Special Agents and a budget of nearly $141 billion by the end of 1975.
The consolidation of multiple Federal agencies into one single organization made it easier to focus and concentrate on all drug control efforts.  Currently, there are 21 divisional offices in the United States, with the DEA headquarters based in Arlington, Virginia, across from the Pentagon.  There are also over 220 field offices of the Drug Enforcement Administration located in 86 different foreign offices, with a budget of over $2.4 billion, and an employee roster of over 10,000, including 5,500 Special Agents. 
The first Administrator in the DEA history was John R. Bartels, Jr. who served from 1973 to 1975. Bartels’ initial goals as Administrator for the Drug Enforcement Administration were to integrate narcotics agents and U.S. Customs agents into a singular, effective force. Secondly, he wanted to restore faith and confidence to the public regarding narcotics and drug law enforcement.
Bartel’s had the hard task of unifying the various Federal offices that were combined to form the DEA to work as a single, cohesive unit while also ensuring the new program’s success in meeting its overall goals of effectively fighting the war on drugs. 
In 1970, the first narcotics task force in Drug Enforcement Administration history was formed and established in New York, with Bruce E. Jensen at the helm coordinating all the anti-drug efforts and investigations. The original task force started with only 43 members, and currently has over 211 law enforcement personnel among its ranks. The new task force proved to be effective by producing 69 arrests alone in 1973 of drug traffickers of cocaine. 
The first years of the DEA history also saw the creation of some of its more important and key programs, such as the Diversion Control Program in 1971, the DEA Intelligence Program in 1973, and the Drug Abuse Warning Network in 1974.  The Diversion Control program was created to concentrate on the misuse and abuse of legal and pharmaceutical drugs and substances and continues to be an important factor in today’s study and research of the diversion issue regarding the misuse of controlled substances.
The DEA Intelligence Program was created to provide for a systematic study and approach to research that would prove essential in gathering information regarding all aspects of drug enforcement.  George M. Belk was the first Assistant Administrator for Intelligence and was in office from 1973 until 1975. The Drug Abuse Warning Network was a program implemented to assist the Federal Government in the study and research of drug abuse in the United States provided by hospitals that collect data to supply to the program to assist in their overarching goal.

Understand the DEA Diversion Control System

Understand the DEA Diversion Control System

The Diversion Control System is a division of the Drug Enforcement Administration that has in recent years become an extremely important factor in attempts for drug enforcement, specifically in terms of controlling and regulating controlled substances, particularly pharmaceutical drugs. 
 
 
With the exception of marijuana or cannabis, all other drugs are produced or manufactured regardless if they are legal pharmaceuticals or illicit drugs like cocaine and heroin. 
 
 
Ultimately, the Diversion Control System is charged with the drug enforcement responsibility of finding methods and ways to control the use and abuse of controlled pharmaceuticals and substances, including prescription drugs, which are often used in ways other than those intended by the manufacturer or as allowed by law. The Diversion Control System has confronted its drug enforcement problem by instituting two distinct problem areas, which they have labeled as the Diversion of Controlled Pharmaceuticals and the Diversion of Controlled Chemicals.
 
 
The Diversion Control System has its roots since the authorization of the Controlled Substances Act in 1970. Originally, the regulation of controlled substances and pharmaceuticals, including prescription drugs, as well as drug enforcement, was the responsibility of the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) before the organization was consolidated with other Government agencies to form a single faction to control and regulate controlled substances and enforce drug laws, now known as the Drug Enforcement Administration, or DEA.
 
 
There has been a notable trend in the rise of pharmaceutical and prescription drugs use ever since the Controlled Substances Act was instituted, as well as advances in science and technology, which have allowed for more medications to be created and developed. The Food and Drug Administration approved over 15,000 controlled pharmaceuticals in 2002, compared to just over 2,000 in 1973. 
 
 
Furthermore, the amount people are spending has also increased from $5.5 billion dollars in 1970, to over $99 billion dollars by the end of 1999. The amount individuals are spending on pharmaceuticals is partly due to the rising costs of medications and treatments, but it also infers that people are depending more on pharmaceuticals, and rising trends may point to abuse or diversion of use of such controlled substances. 
 
 
Currently, the DEA has reported that the abuse and illicit use of controlled pharmaceuticals has accounted for over 30 percent of all deaths and injuries regarding drug abuse. The DEA also reported that the most commonly abused pharmaceuticals or legal controlled substances are stimulants, depressants, anabolic steroids, and narcotics, as defined by the DEA, some of which are prescription drugs. 
 
 
The Diversion of Controlled Pharmaceuticals directly relates to the diversion drug enforcement and illegal use of legally manufactured and distributed substances such as narcotics, depressants, and stimulants. Their potential for abuse has been rated as highly possible, and therefore, have been included as controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act, or CSA. 
 
 
The main problem the DEA faces is having these controlled substances under regulation and restrictions, while also making them readily available to the individuals that have medical reasons for use. Any person or company that deals with any of the substances or prescription drugs under Drug Enforcement Agency control must be registered with the Agency and comply with their controlled substances policies and regulations. Examples of certain cases of diversion of controlled pharmaceuticals include:
 
 
 
*Physicians illegally selling pharmaceuticals to drug dealers and/or abusers;
 
*Falsification of records for purpose of illicit selling of prescriptions;
 
*Theft by employees;
 
*Forgery of prescriptions;
 
*Formation of rogue or underground pharmacies for illegal sale of substances over mail or internet;
 
*Armed robbery of pharmacies.
 
 
 
The Diversion of Controlled Chemicals mostly deals with all other substances that are not readily available or distributed as pharmaceuticals or prescription drugs, yet under CSA classifications some still prove to have medical use or treatments. One of the main problems regarding these types of substances is that many of them must be chemically treated or altered to produce or manufacture their illicit forms.  
 
 
For example, heroin is produced through the use of certain chemical compounds or agents to be manufactured from its original source, opium. Other drugs, such as PCP, methamphetamine, and MDMA, are purely chemical substances manufactured from other chemicals. Many of these can be produced using common household chemicals and available prescription drugs. 
 
 
This has proven to be a problem until recent years because many of the chemicals used to produce the illicit substances such as methamphetamine, were not controlled under CSA standards. It was not until 1988 that the Chemical Diversion and Trafficking Act that imposed certain restrictions and regulations regarding the availability of certain chemicals that can be used as precursors to manufacture illegal drugs.
 
 
The Diversion Control System has its own division under the Drug Enforcement Agency, known as the Office of Diversion Control. It is part of the Operations Division and is separated into Field sub-offices and Tactical Diversion Squads, which operate under supervision of DEA Special Agents. This Division consists of personnel that includes chemists, pharmacologists, program analysts, and special DEA personnel known as Diversion Investigators. Diversion Investigators have responsibilities that include:
 
 
 
*Review and approval of applications of registrants with DEA;
 
*Background reviews of all applicants, including company employees;
 
*Inspection of applicant security measures to protect the controlled substances from theft;
 
*Investigations involving all aspects of diversion control crimes and violations.
 
 
 
As a whole, the Diversion Control System and its affiliated personnel have the basic responsibilities that include: field management and coordination of investigations; composing or drafting new regulations for pharmaceuticals; establishing pharmaceutical and controlled substances quotas; proposals of national legislation; investigation of chemicals not currently under control; tracking distribution of controlled prescription drugs and chemicals; and research and intelligence.
 
 
The Diversion Control System has become an important factor to the Drug Enforcement Agency in controlling the abuse and misuse of controlled substances, particularly by addressing the growing concern and trend regarding the diversion of pharmaceuticals and prescription drugs for illicit use and traffic

The DEA’s Impact on Drug Trade

The DEA's Impact on Drug Trade

The Drug Enforcement Administration has the ultimate goal of eradicating, or at the very least, curtailing the spread of drugs on the streets through various avenues such as the manufacturing, trafficking, and distribution of illicit or controlled substances.  The first order of business for the Drug Enforcement Administration is to simply enforce the Controlled Substance Act and its legislation. However, the impact that the laws and regulations have on drug trade still remains unclear.
 
 
Though efforts have been made, some with fairly impressive results, the fact remains that drugs and controlled substances remain to be illegally trafficked and distributed. It is important to recognize that the criminal's deviant behavior is not going to change, regardless of how often these laws change themselves or adapt. 
 
 
As of 2009, just over 30,000 arrests were recorded on the domestic front by the Drug Enforcement Administration. However, by comparison to previous years, 2002 was the last year to break the 30,000 mark, signifying the obvious increase in arrests, and therefore, increased activity in the drug trade.
 
 
In 2005, the Drug Enforcement Administration reported almost $1.4 billion in drug trade-related assets and $477 million in drugs that were successfully seized. At first glance, these numbers prove to be impressive, however, it is reported that in the United States alone, illegal drug trade accounts for nearly $65 billion in drugs a year. The Drug Enforcement Administration managed to seize almost one percent of how much is being trafficked in and out of the United States' borders.
 
 
Though it would be considered unfair to not give the DEA credit in its attempts to deter and limit illegal drug trade, it is important to note the statistics and the actual effectiveness of the Drug Enforcement Administration, considering that it is allowed a budget of nearly $2.5 billion dollars annually, about one-fifth of what the DEA managed to seize in drugs in 2005. 
 
 
The war on drugs illegal drug trade has been a global effort, but on the domestic front, drugs and controlled substances still manage to infiltrate the country. The United States’ biggest concerns deal with the influx of the drug trade from the Mexican border. The Drug Enforcement Administration, along with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Border Patrol, have joined forces to try reduce the drug trade occurring along the 2,000 mile stretch of Mexican-United States border. 
 
 
Though it is true that hundreds of tons of drugs and money have been seized since their coalition to stop drug trade along the border, the drugs are still making it on to the streets, proving that no matter what implementations–whether legislative or man-powered–Mexican drug lords will simply not respect any laws or regulations, and constantly and effectively circumvent any new methods imposed by the DEA to stop them.
 
 
Although the Drug Enforcement Administration has managed to stop some of the illicit drugs from flooding the streets and black markets, their effects still pale in comparison to the actual amounts still making it within the borders.

The Drug Enforcement Agency’s War on Drugs

The Drug Enforcement Agency's War on Drugs

The War on Drugs is the cohesive effort of many countries of the world that stresses the strict regulation or ban of certain drugs or controlled substances. The United States has been the country leading the charge against the war on drugs, ever since President Richard Nixon first used the term in 1969.
 
 
The United States Government has allowed for providing military and economic aid to certain countries in attempts to reduce drug trafficking as well as curtail crimes of violence due to illegal drugs throughout the globe. The United States Government can be said to begin the war on drugs as early as the turn of the 20th Century, with provisions such as the Narcotics Tax Act of 1914 and the National Prohibition Act of 1919, which restricted the use of certain drugs and completely banned the use of alcohol respectively.
 
 
However, the current state of the war on drugs can be said to have begun with implementation of the Controlled Substances Act and the formation of the Drug Enforcement Administration. The DEA's sole purpose was to implement the legislation and regulations of the Controlled Substances Act in an effort to curtail illegal drug or controlled substance distribution and/or use, as well as drug-related crime.
 
 
Throughout the decades since the inception of the Controlled Substances Act and the birth of the DEA, arrests and incarcerations in the United States have steadily risen, hitting a tremendous rise at the start of the 1980s. Out of the one million incarcerations in the country, the fourth most common is the arrest due to the possession of marijuana or cannabis.
 
 
Drug offenses lead to some of the highest arrests rates in the nation. Furthermore, since Nixon's declaration of war on drugs, it seems as if the crime rates have steadily gone up, many blaming the restrictions of controlled substances as a main cause for more illegal drug and substance criminal activity. Many who oppose the DEA's current efforts will constantly remind the public that the war on drugs has not been effectively fought by any of the factions involved. Increased gang activity and criminal violence and the lack of overall effectiveness of the DEA are cited through various statistics and facts.
 
 
Though the DEA has proven to have some advancement on the war on drugs, their ultimate efforts prove to be minimal when drugs are still finding their way into the country and drug cartels do not seem to be deterred from their illegal practices nor show signs adhering to governmental threats imposed by laws or even actual military force. Such is evident with current events involving the drug cartels in Mexico and the nation's own drug war.
 
 
The United States has allowed for a commitment of $1.4 billion dollars in aid to Mexico to help arm, train, advise their military and law enforcement organizations in order to help combat some of the drug cartels that are violently opposing the country's efforts to shut down their illegal drug trafficking and trade. The United States holds the drug war in Mexico in high priority because of its proximity, and more importantly, because it has proven to be the gateway to illegal drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, heroine, and methamphetamine to enter the country, regardless of efforts by the DEA, CIA, FBI, and the U.S. Border Patrol.
 
 
The DEA's effectiveness in the war on drugs is still unclear, but what is apparent is that the violence and bloodshed continue, while drug cartels and kingpins still manage to stay in business, lining their pockets with money.

An Overview of the Drug Enforcement Agency

An Overview of the Drug Enforcement Agency

Background
The Drug Enforcement Agency, or DEA, is arguably the foremost organization on the war on drugs. Created in 1973 by President Richard Nixon, the DEA is responsible for the enforcement of the United States drug laws and legislation. The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 made it evident that concern for the drug use in the United States was growing and certain control was necessary in order to help curtail and restrict the use of drugs. 
Though drugs had not reached a peak in terms of becoming a problem or concern, the stigma surrounding drugs was more than evident and its effect on society was clear enough to make drug laws a necessity. The DEA was born out of the need for a single agency to enforce the new drug laws. The DEA is also responsible for the scientific and medical determination of categorizing all types of drugs or substances that have potential to become abused and/or an addiction problem.  
Currently, the Drug Enforcement Agency is headed by Michele Leonhart, and continues its efforts to end the war on drugs on both the national and international levels.
History
The history of the DEA is one that is extensive and filled with important advances against the war on drugs. The Drug Enforcement Administration was created with the purpose of becoming the single and unified organization to enforce the drug laws and regulations of the United States, while also conducting the forefront, both on domestic and international levels, against the war on drugs. Though drugs were not at their height, in 1973 President Nixon declared “an all-out global war on the drug menace,” and sent the legislation proposing the creation of the DEA. 
The new organization  hit the ground running, immediately instituting various programs and many field offices across the United States and the rest of the world. By the end of 1974, there were nearly 45 offices opened throughout the globe alone. Instituting a global assault proved essential in later years when the DEA managed to capture Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar in 1984. The DEA developed programs such as the New York Task Force and the DEA Intelligence Program that served as precursors to the one’s created throughout the years to help coordinate task force, field agents, and string operations.
Creation and Purpose
The Drug Enforcement Agency is the single federal agency that enforces the United States drug laws and regulations, as well as all involving the illicit use or abuse of drugs and controlled substances. The DEA was established on July 1st, 1973, under President Richard Nixon’s administration. The main purpose was to consolidate the various factions or organizations in one, singular department in charge of employing the nation’s drug laws and enforcement. 
The DEA essentially was the combination of two major organizations, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Department of Justice (BNDD) and the Office of Drug Abuse Law Enforcement Department of Justice (ODALE), as well other minor or smaller departments of justice. John R. Bartels, Jr. was the first DEA Administrator and oversaw the creation of key programs such as the Diversion Control Program, the DEA Intelligence Program, and the New York Task Force. 
All these programs are still functioning today, providing for different aspects as intelligence collection and research and a strong, efficient task force based in New York. The DEA is based out of Arlington, Virginia, across from the Pentagon, but has 21 domestic field divisions throughout the country, as well as 86 foreign offices in 62 countries.
Criticisms


The DEA is charged with the noble effort on fighting the war on drugs, both on the national and global spectrum. However, the organization has been the subject of criticism and debate regarding its overall responsibilities and methods. Certain organizations denounce the DEA as not having the proper authority to schedule drugs according the Controlled Substances Act, and that responsibility is legally reserved for the FDA and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. 
Secondly, the DEA decisions regarding the placement of certain drugs that may have viable medical applications in the most restrictive of all the provisions is contrary to legal and federal legislation. Another aspect that is also criticized is the DEA’s apparent focus of drug operations or busts that are on the large or grand scale and of an international nature or consequence. Many debate whether their concentration on these bigger cases is related to the potential of a larger seizure of goods or assets and publicity. 
The DEA’s stance on how certain drugs are more vehemently sought after by their operations such as cocaine and heroin is also in question when marijuana and pharmaceuticals are statistically more popular and abused in current times.
DEA Agents
DEA agents of the foremost authority of drug law enforcement personnel. They are actively on the field and fighting the war on drugs on a daily basis. Though the opportunities exist to become a DEA agent and lead the exciting career of a special agent, the DEA selects only those men and women that are the most qualified and have a commitment to fighting the war on drugs. The qualifications for DEA eligibility are fairly strict, and the hiring process can be intense, with the possibility of it lasting over a year to successfully complete. 
Once hired, DEA agents attend basic training for a period of 16 weeks, where they are tested mentally and physically through a rigorous training program structured to mold them in to the best possible DEA agents. DEA agents are eligible to receive excellent benefit packages, as well as the possibility of earning close to $100,000 after only four years of service.
Impact of Drug Trade
The Drug Enforcement Administration is considered as the foremost organization in the world when it comes to combating illegal drugs and controlled substances. One of its main roles is to enforce and implement the Controlled Substances Act in order to provide for a strict guideline of restrictions regarding certain drugs and chemicals. Furthermore, the DEA is well-known for its efforts against the illicit drug trafficking of narcotics and seizure of illegally obtained assets as well as illicit drugs. 
However, the overall effect that the agency has upon the war on drugs is of some dispute. Though their efforts have produced certain results, drug trafficking is still a problem not just within United States borders, but a the global spectrum as well. Their actual effective seems to be of a minimal impact when regarding the amounts of drugs being illegally bough and sold throughout the world. The DEA’s attempts to enforce stricter laws and more stringent control policies seems to be in vein when drug cartels and illegal organization still manage to traffic illegal drugs and make millions in the process.
Diversion Control System
The Diversion Control System is a program and also division extension of the DEA. Under the Office of Diversion Control, the Drug Enforcement Administration is addressing the current and growing problem of the abuse and misuse of legal controlled substances and pharmaceuticals. The abuse of potentially addicting substances such as Percocet, Vicodin, Morphine, and Oxycontin is becoming more prevalent and a problem in the United States. 
The Office of Diversion Control essentially exists to find a necessary balance between the ready availability of such substances, while also regulating and imposing certain restrictions that may help reduce the amount that they are abused or used for other purposes than legally and/or medically intended. 
The Office of Diversion has various responsibilities that include the registration of all applicants with DEA, the research and study of new chemicals or those not currently under control, implementation of the laws and regulations concurrent with the Controlled Substances Act and DEA policy to pharmaceuticals and legal controlled substances, investigation of diversion use and its various criminal activities, and the recommendation of new laws and legislation that may help prevent or reduce diversion use of pharmaceuticals and other controlled substances.
Careers in DEA
The DEA offers great opportunities for careers and jobs for those with an interest in combating the war on drugs. Not all careers in the DEA deal with explicitly being on the field, dealing with drug cartels and kingpins on a daily basis.  The DEA offers a wide array of careers choices that employ different aspects of law enforcement that may be in line with certain peoples interest. Recruitment possibilities exist at many levels, including Diversion Investigator, Forensic Specialist, Intelligence Research Specialists, and even opportunities exist for college students interested in the possibility of interning for the agency. 
The DEA proves to be a great career experience while providing for an excellent environment to work, especially if traveling is of interest, for it is required to be willing to relocate at any given time. However, the DEA does only choose the most qualified and determined candidates, enforcing their drug policies and regulations to all their employees; furthermore, strict qualifications and strenuous hiring process must all be successfully completed in order to be considered for hire in a career for the DEA.
War on Drugs
The War on Drugs is used to describe the efforts of various countries around the globe to stop the illegal trafficking of drugs and controlled substances through the implementation of strict laws and regulations, and in some cases, military and law enforcement involvement. The war on drugs was first coined by President Nixon in his address regarding the passage of the Controlled Substances Act, where he “declares war” on the use and trafficking of illicit drugs and substances. 
The war on drugs still rages today, causing for much concern among the leading governments in the world, with the United States being the self-appointed chief. Currently, there is much debate and controversy regarding the war on drugs, as more statistics and facts seem to prove that the efforts of organizations such as DEA are not only insufficient, but are not deterring or curtailing the drug trafficking in the United States alone. 
Current events involving Mexico’s problem with drug cartels and illegal drug trafficking seem to prove that the DEA, as noble as their efforts may be, have done been able make these drug kingpins fear the United States’ war on drugs, and furthermore, their drugs are still on making their way on to American streets. 

A History of Drug Enforcement Agency

A History of Drug Enforcement Agency

DEA history can be traced back further than its own inception in 1973, with the Bureau of Internal Revenue, which was also in charge of enforcing the first Federal laws against opium. The DEA history continues, according to DEA information, further with the Bureau of Prohibition which was created in 1927 and was in charge of enforcing the 18th Amendment of the Constitution in 1919.
 
 
Eventually, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) would be created, and by 1973, would be combined with other organizations to ultimately become the Drug Enforcement Agency.
 
 
DEA history shows that little has changed in terms of its ultimate mission: enforce the controlled substances laws and regulations of the United States and bring justice to all those persons or organizations that break the controlled substance laws by the illicit manufacture, trafficking, or distribution of controlled drugs or substances. Initially, DEA information places about 1,470 agents and a $74.9 million dollar budget when the agency was created. By 1980, there were close to 2,000 agents on the field and a budget of nearly $206 million dollars.
 
 
As of 2003, according to DEA information, the numbers continue to grow, with nearly 5,000 agents and a budget of $1.9 billion dollars. It is clear that the Government recognizes the importance of fighting the drug war, and the DEA is the largest organization fronting the charge, both on the domestic and international fronts. 
 
 
In 2009 alone, according to DEA information, there were over 30,000 arrests by the DEA on the domestic front, with nearly 50,000kgs of Cocaine, 642kgs of Heroin, over 600,000kgs of Marijuana, and nearly 2,000kgs of Methamphetamine seized from illicit manufacturers and drug traffickers.
 
 
Since the beginning of DEA history, the organization has been responsible for over 600,000 prosecutions on United States soil alone. The DEA has managed to become effective in breaking down drug cartels and drug trafficking rings with its various programs and tactical operation strikes throughout the world.
 
 
The first narcotics task force in DEA history was implemented in 1970 in New York. The task force began with only 43 agents and a small support staff. By 2003, the task force would see its personnel grow to 211 law enforcement members. Early success would prove to be essential to the DEA, with the help of collaborative efforts on the Federal, State, and local levels, operations would become a success with investigative and tactical implementations.
 
 
In 1972, the New York Task Force seized nearly $1 million dollars during an arrest in the Bronx. A year later, in 1973, 69 drug traffickers were arrested for the alleged distribution of nearly 100kgs of cocaine in one week's time.
 
 
The DEA history also includes some of the biggest drug busts in the history of drug enforcement. In 1991, according to DEA information, the DEA seized over 59 boxes containing 1,080 pounds of heroin. The estimated street value of the seizure was said to be between $2.5 billion to $4 billion dollars, making it the largest heroin bust in history.
 
 
In 1984, arguably the most infamous drug bust in the DEA history books occurred when they helped coordinate and launch an attack on Colombian cocaine king, Pablo Escobar. Pablo Escobar is easily the most notorious cocaine trafficker of all time, with over fifty percent of the cocaine in America in the 1980s linked to him and his cartel. Escobar and his cartel were making an average of $25 billion dollars a year. By the time he was 32, he was making over half a million dollars daily.
 
 
The DEA managed to get inside information and tip off the Colombian government, allowing a raid on Escobar's drug laboratory named Tranquilandia. The raid uncovered over fourteen tons of cocaine, easily worth over a billion dollars in the 1980s. The Colombians managed to make the mistake when they sent one of their nationals to New Jersey requesting to pay in cash for two metric tons of ether, which was half of the ether imports of the country for 1980. 
 
 
The company notified the DEA, which allowed them to set up a false company under Operation Scorpion. They contacted the Colombian individual who filled his order. They tracked the shipment via satellite to the dense jungle in Colombia, where Tranquilandia would eventually be found.