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4 Ways to Help Victims of Abuse

4 Ways to Help Victims of Abuse

Abuse can take many forms, such as sexual abuse, domestic abuse, spousal abuse, mental abuse, emotional abuse, child abuse, elder abuse, employment abuse, and physical abuse. In any of these cases, it is a right of every human being to enjoy the right of a peaceful existence without the threat of harm or violence. If an individual suspects that they are the victim of abuse, one is encouraged to do any or all of the following, the primary objective being to remove oneself from a harmful and detrimental environment:
1.       Visit a legal library, consult with peers, and/or consult with an attorney specializing in abuse. Doing so will allow the individual to determine whether or not their experience(s) constitutes abuse. Although emotional and psychological abuse is more difficult to prove, it is a very real danger and should be explored immediately. The absence of physical violence should never discount the severity of suspected abuse. 
2.       In the event of physical or sexual violence, the individual is urged to inform the authorities, speak to a confidant, or visit a shelter or center that specializes in the treatment of abuse. 
3.       Individuals are encouraged not to respond with violence or equally harmful measures. Although the victim of abuse may find themselves to be rightfully angry and resentful, a violent or unlawful response could lead to further damage, injury, or legal trouble.
4.       Most importantly, the individual is encouraged to remember that no one deserves to be touched, handled, spoken to, or treated in a harmful, inappropriate manner. Perpetrators of abuse can range from spouses, family members, and coworkers. Victims of abuse should seek help immediately.  
A good start is contacting the National Abuse Hotline at their toll-free phone number: (800) 799-7233.
Family laws has more information about abuse. 

Alcohol Abuse Overview

Alcohol Abuse Overview

Legal Context for Alcohol Abuse
As a general rule, the legal measures and theories pertaining to instances and cases of “alcohol abuse” in the United States cannot be equated with those passed under the criminal justice system pertinent to other forms of “abuse,” such as child abuse and spousal abuse. Alcohol abuse could variously be defined as stemming from the long-term behavior suggesting patterns of activity on the part of the person affected or from individual instances and episodes placing the person carrying out the abuse in clear and present danger. 
Neither activity is by itself illegal, regardless of how ultimately irresponsible and unsafe it might be for the person engaging in such behaviors. 
Legal Measures Preventing Alcohol Abuse
Alcohol abuse can conceivably be covered under criminal law most applicably when the behaviors caused by the alcohol abuse have caused the individual involved to violate the law and conceivably to place others at risk of bodily harm. While the court system will not generally forbid alcohol abuse by the defendant per se, it may place conditions on that person, for the prevention of more serious penalties being applied, to take courses, undergo treatment or allow for other measures which will, among other things, make the recurrence of alcohol abuse less likely, and potentially put an end to the harmful behavior patterns at fault. 
Alcohol education classes and enrollment in Alcoholics Anonymous are some of the measures which are commonly applied toward preventing the actions associated with alcohol abuse from continuing to happen.